This is great - how to deal with trolls.

Vi Hart’s Guide to Comments (by Vihart)

Via Brainpickings.

Packed full of anecdotal, first person insights on teens’ Facebook usage.

Ellen Barkin’s guffaw-inducing, potty-mouthed tweets are glittering diamonds amongst the shit torrent of flack-bland, celebrity Twitter musings. 
Big thanks to Buzzfeed for the strong compiling skills. 
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Ellen Barkin’s guffaw-inducing, potty-mouthed tweets are glittering diamonds amongst the shit torrent of flack-bland, celebrity Twitter musings. 

Big thanks to Buzzfeed for the strong compiling skills

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Ellen Barker twitter

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Ellen Barker twitter

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Ellen Barker twitter

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Ellen Barker

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Ellen Barker twitter

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Ellen Barker twitter

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Ellen Barker twitter

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Ellen Barker tweet

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Ellen Barker tweet

F1 is not doing enough to engage fans off the race track, says analyst (see link below). 
I have to agree - brands commit fortunes to sponsorships, yet often fail to follow-through with the PR and social media to promote those massive platforms. 
Worse still, some brands fail to connect the sponsorship to the product. There’s frequently a an inability to integrate the product message to the brand sponsorship message.
The key is to be integrated from the start - and look not just at which properties (often sports or music) best meet the sponsorship objectives, but which ones work through the line. 
Sponsorship strategists often fail to grasp how experiential, advertising, PR and social media specialists can amplify these brand properties. Certainly, I have seen proposals where the head of sponsorship has made pithy comments about it being ‘great for PR and social media’, where there clearly isn’t. 
Guinness’ rugby sponsorship is probably the best example of an integrated sponsorship going at the moment - stunning. That said, I have advised brands like T-Mobile and Nissan on their own properties in the past, with expectation-beating results. 
For the vast majority however, brand sponsorship remains a poorly-tapped resource. 
(via BBC News - How F1 teams and sponsors aim to drive fan interest)

F1 is not doing enough to engage fans off the race track, says analyst (see link below). 

I have to agree - brands commit fortunes to sponsorships, yet often fail to follow-through with the PR and social media to promote those massive platforms. 

Worse still, some brands fail to connect the sponsorship to the product. There’s frequently a an inability to integrate the product message to the brand sponsorship message.

The key is to be integrated from the start - and look not just at which properties (often sports or music) best meet the sponsorship objectives, but which ones work through the line. 

Sponsorship strategists often fail to grasp how experiential, advertising, PR and social media specialists can amplify these brand properties. Certainly, I have seen proposals where the head of sponsorship has made pithy comments about it being ‘great for PR and social media’, where there clearly isn’t. 

Guinness’ rugby sponsorship is probably the best example of an integrated sponsorship going at the moment - stunning. That said, I have advised brands like T-Mobile and Nissan on their own properties in the past, with expectation-beating results. 

For the vast majority however, brand sponsorship remains a poorly-tapped resource. 

(via BBC News - How F1 teams and sponsors aim to drive fan interest)

Want to know how to Like someone on Facebook in 75 languages? Here you go…
(via Like Button From Around The World: Pics, Videos, Links, News)

Want to know how to Like someone on Facebook in 75 languages? Here you go…

(via Like Button From Around The World: Pics, Videos, Links, News)

Every year in Cannes, the ad industry has a kind of circle jerk. It’s called the Cannes Lions, and awards campaigns deemed the best in the industry for that year by judges.

The winners acknowledge the importance of the awards, whilst the losers say that agencies shoud focus on client goals. Each party is right in his or her own way in the assertion.

There’s a PR category, but PR agencies never win it. This is probably becuase the category was only invented because, a few years ago, ad agencies could see the future and it looked PR-shaped. This was when most research said that people stopped paying attention to advertising. So ad agencies could kind of partially reinvent themselves as PR agencies by winning PR awards which were judged to be PR successes by ad men. A typical ad land approach and the one that led to the need for the category in the first place. Maybe.

Anyway, whether you like ad campaigns or not, to publicise itself a ‘social media agency’ has organised some of the winning Cannes Lions awards by themes which it calls trends into this handy slide show. Though none of the agency’s work appears to feature in the slide show, and despite not winning anything at Cannes, or even being there, it is perhaps basking in the glory reflected by the winning agencies.

Anyway I like looking at these sorts of things, even if they somehow seem anti-climactic compared to the passion pursuit of a new idea. Maybe you like them too. Well here they are, and thanks to the agency that took the time and effort amidst the ‘flurry of pitches and projects’ that stopped it from attending Cannes to post this analysis.

12 Trends from Cannes 2011 View more presentations from The Social Practice

"Neat Miami ad school student concept for Heineken."

Heineken – The Invite

Quality of leads Retention period Lifetime value per lead Length of sales cycle Number of new customers referred by lead

Just like they did with IM, parents snoop on their kids on Facebook.
(via Visual Loop - 1 in 3 Parents of Teens Snoop on Facebook)

Just like they did with IM, parents snoop on their kids on Facebook.

(via Visual Loop - 1 in 3 Parents of Teens Snoop on Facebook)

THE DEATH OF LINK FARMS?
The search rankings of blogs we write for clients jumped in page rank today, making them even more visible on Google.
The reason? Google appears to have launched Panda in a bid to rid boost the qauality of its search results, and combat the link farms churning out content rammed with SEO keywords.
Thye big lessons for brands are to make their content brilliant, relevant and new. Sharp ideas and fantastic professional writing are a bout to be more in demand than ever.
Clikc the link to find out more.
(via Google Panda: Forcing Businesses to Create Better Content)

THE DEATH OF LINK FARMS?

The search rankings of blogs we write for clients jumped in page rank today, making them even more visible on Google.

The reason? Google appears to have launched Panda in a bid to rid boost the qauality of its search results, and combat the link farms churning out content rammed with SEO keywords.

Thye big lessons for brands are to make their content brilliant, relevant and new. Sharp ideas and fantastic professional writing are a bout to be more in demand than ever.

Clikc the link to find out more.

(via Google Panda: Forcing Businesses to Create Better Content)